Business, Business Leader, Investments

Paul Mampilly Leaves Wall Street to Bring Financial Security to Average Investors

Paul Mampilly uses his knowledge and experience as a successful investor to help average Americans become financially secure. He spent many years working on Wall Street as a portfolio manager for Bankers Trust, Deutsche Bank, and ING before he became a hedge fund manager for Kinetics Asset Management. Kinetics Asset Management was one of the best performing hedge funds under Paul Mampilly’s management, which led to Barron’s naming this hedge fund as being one of the “World’s Best.” He wanted to spend more time with his family, so he left Wall Street and started working as a researcher and financial analyst while helping average people become better investors.

Paul Mampilly started a newsletter called Profits Unlimited when he joined Banyan Hill Publishing in 2016. This newsletter reaches over 90,000 subscribers each month and provides them with guidance on new investment opportunities and stock buying/selling recommendations. Subscribers can also follow the newsletter’s model portfolio, which is tracked by Paul. He is also a weekly columnist for Winning Investor Daily and manages two stock trading services.

Paul Mampilly recently sat down for an interview with Enterprise Radio’s Eric Dye to discuss his career on Wall Street and his career as a publisher, advisor, and educator. Paul stated that he maintains a similar routine that he had while he was working on Wall Street. His daily routine consists of 12 to 14 hours of reading, tracking the stocks he recommends to his readers, researching companies, and studying how market sentiment affects stock prices.

Paul Mampilly said that the biggest change he has seen in the stock market over the past 20 years is the use of computers. He said that computers have leveled the playing field for average investors who are going up against institutional investors because average investors now have access to the same tools that institutional investors use. Leveling the playing field for average investors has been Paul’s goal since he left Wall Street.