Philanthropist

Denver Philanthropist Matthew Autterson Continues to

Help the Community

Beginning as early as 2000 Matthew Autterson has been a fixture in Denver’s philanthropic circles. The Denver Post reports on one such fundraiser for which Autterson secured the $50,000 title sponsor. The event, entitled “The Do at the Zoo” raised approximately $600,000 from 2,500 guests. The proceeds were earmarked for a new children’s carousel. Autterson’s efforts become even more impressive upon learning that the very first “Do” held 11 years before this one attracted only 325 guests. The event has grown in its reach and impact, and now over a decade later, Matthew Autterson is proud to continue giving back to the Denver community.

A graduate of Michigan State University, Autterson received his B.A. in Finance there prior to attending the Univerity of Denver’s Graduate Tax Program. Now, following a successful career in the corporate sector, Autterson has turned his efforts to the non-profit world. His work with Falci Adaptive Biosystems provides devices and care aimed at increasing the independence and quality of life of those that suffer from neuromotor disabilities. Autterson is dedicated to this mission of improving the lives of those that suffer from these disabilities through greater access and control of their environments. Now that he has shifted to the nonprofit sector Matthew can devote more of his time and energy to helping those that are truly in need.

As a member of the Board of Directors of Falci Adaptive Equipment, Autterson has also worked in increasing leisure and pleasure pursuits of those confined to wheelchairs. Through Falci’s Motor Sports program, people that are wheelchair bound are able to race modified race cars in order to enjoy one of life’s great pleasures. Car racing is a great candidate for adaptive devices due to the fact that the car is doing a lot of the work. Adaptive devices allow program participants the opportunity to drive race cars just as the professionals do.

These experiences are complete with racing gear, pit crews, and fast laps around the track. The reality of many people who are in wheelchairs is that they have highly developed upper body muscles and strength. Falci looks to utilize this strength and create devices that can be modified for control by hands and arms.

Matthew Autterson has been interested in helping his community since that Denver Zoo gala back in 2000. Now through his association with Falci Adaptive Equipment, he continues to help make the world a better place.